Photo 22 Oct 41 notes betweenmirrors-com:

"#Observatory" by @alexggriffiths

#drawing #sketch #engineering #mouse #astronomy #lowbrow #popsurrealism #fantasyart #surreal

betweenmirrors-com:

"#Observatory" by @alexggriffiths

#drawing #sketch #engineering #mouse #astronomy #lowbrow #popsurrealism #fantasyart #surreal

Photo 21 Oct 267 notes tinyhousesmallspace:

Bada Table - From table to loveseat

tinyhousesmallspace:

Bada Table - From table to loveseat

Video 20 Oct

Don Vino Wine Table by Chicone Furniture

Photo 19 Oct 3,379 notes steampunktendencies:

Located at the Cincinnati Public Library it was designed by sculptor Michael Frasca and dedicated in 1990.
"The Amelia Valerio Weinberg Memorial Fountain is located on the Vine Street Plaza in front of the Main Library. Conceived and executed by former Cincinnati sculptor Michael Frasca, this ornamental fountain was made possible by a bequest from Mrs. Weinberg and was dedicated in 1990. Affectionately known as the “book fountain,” the sculpture features water cascading over a stack of ceramic tile books, representing the free flow of information and ideas through the printed word. The fountain is a popular spot for school groups and tourists." (Photo J.F Schmitz)

steampunktendencies:

Located at the Cincinnati Public Library it was designed by sculptor Michael Frasca and dedicated in 1990.

"The Amelia Valerio Weinberg Memorial Fountain is located on the Vine Street Plaza in front of the Main Library. Conceived and executed by former Cincinnati sculptor Michael Frasca, this ornamental fountain was made possible by a bequest from Mrs. Weinberg and was dedicated in 1990. Affectionately known as the “book fountain,” the sculpture features water cascading over a stack of ceramic tile books, representing the free flow of information and ideas through the printed word. The fountain is a popular spot for school groups and tourists." (Photo J.F Schmitz)

Video 19 Oct 643 notes
Photo 18 Oct 1,293 notes
Photo 18 Oct 220 notes alcrego:

Balance of Nature
Original photo (by Hyuro): Muro 72 (in flickr)
Here is her official website: http://www.hyuro.es
Follow her works here: Hyuro’s Facebook

alcrego:

Balance of Nature

Original photo (by Hyuro): Muro 72 (in flickr)

Here is her official website: http://www.hyuro.es

Follow her works here: Hyuro’s Facebook

Video 18 Oct

T@tris furniture by Lisbon-based designer Pedro Machado.

This solution for small spaces takes the well-known form of Tetris puzzle pieces and displays them in a versatile volume that can come in handy in many situations. All the pieces can be pulled to shape different furniture pieces – two square blocks on each side and a flat surface on top can become a table with two chairs. Other pieces are drawers and can accommodate different personal items. The overall design allows the user to interact with this versatile piece of furniture and create a personalized function.

Visit Pedro’s website to watch a video of the piece being used.

Video 17 Oct 385 notes

archiemcphee:

This awesome Interactive Origami Sculpture was created by Brasil-based origami artist Jo Nakashima, who’d been challenged to create something inspired by the fascinating Ghostcube system made by Swedish designer Erik Åberg. Nothing but paper and glue make up this interlocking system of 40 paper cubes.

If you’re feeling dexterous, Nakashima created a 45-step Instructables tutorial to help you make your very own kinetic origami sculpture.

He also runs an extraordinarily popular YouTube channel devoted to instructional origami videos, which is well worth a visit.

[via Colossal]

Photo 17 Oct Ritual Object (Cong) via The Met

This ritual object is one of the principal jade types of the Liangzhu culture that flourished on the eastern coast of China during the third millennium B.C. It has the most complex shape of the Neolithic Chinese jades—a tube with a square cross-section and a round hole—and almost invariably is decorated on its four corners with face motifs characterized by circular eyes and a bar-shaped nose. The cong seems to have evolved from the bracelet and gradually acquired its standard form by 2500 B.C. The function and meaning of the cong remain unknown. The discovery of cong in large, lavishly furnished tombs suggests that it probably signified wealth and privileged social status. It may, however, have had other functions as well. In a recently excavated tomb, numerous cong lay in a circle around the tomb occupant, suggesting that they had been arranged for a specific religious or ritual purpose.

Period: Neolithic period, Liangzhu culture (ca. 3200–2000 B.C.)Date: ca. 2400 B.C.Culture: ChinaMedium: Jade (nephrite)Dimensions: H. 10 in. (25.4 cm); W. 2 3/4 in. (7 cm)Classification: JadeCredit Line: Purchase, Sir Joseph Hotung Gift, 2004Accession Number: 2004.52On view in Gallery 207 

Ritual Object (Cong) via The Met

This ritual object is one of the principal jade types of the Liangzhu culture that flourished on the eastern coast of China during the third millennium B.C. It has the most complex shape of the Neolithic Chinese jades—a tube with a square cross-section and a round hole—and almost invariably is decorated on its four corners with face motifs characterized by circular eyes and a bar-shaped nose. The cong seems to have evolved from the bracelet and gradually acquired its standard form by 2500 B.C. The function and meaning of the cong remain unknown. The discovery of cong in large, lavishly furnished tombs suggests that it probably signified wealth and privileged social status. It may, however, have had other functions as well. In a recently excavated tomb, numerous cong lay in a circle around the tomb occupant, suggesting that they had been arranged for a specific religious or ritual purpose.

Period: Neolithic period, Liangzhu culture (ca. 3200–2000 B.C.)
Date: ca. 2400 B.C.
Culture: China
Medium: Jade (nephrite)
Dimensions: H. 10 in. (25.4 cm); W. 2 3/4 in. (7 cm)
Classification: Jade
Credit Line: Purchase, Sir Joseph Hotung Gift, 2004
Accession Number: 2004.52
On view in Gallery 207 

Photo 16 Oct Fragment of Acacia Wood from the Step Pyramid Complex at Saqqara via The Museum of Modern ArtPeriod: Old KingdomDynasty: Dynasty 3Date: ca. 2649–2100 B.C.Geography: From Egypt, Memphite Region, Saqqara; includes the Serapeum, Djoser Pyramid Complex, Southern Tomb, entrance passageMedium: Wood, acaciaDimensions: l. 21 cm (8 1/4 in); w. 14 cm (5 1/2 in); th. 4.7 cm (1 7/8 in)Credit Line: Gift of Prentice Duell, 1933Accession Number: 33.7Not on view

Fragment of Acacia Wood from the Step Pyramid Complex at Saqqara via The Museum of Modern Art
Period: Old Kingdom
Dynasty: Dynasty 3
Date: ca. 2649–2100 B.C.
Geography: From Egypt, Memphite Region, Saqqara; includes the Serapeum, Djoser Pyramid Complex, Southern Tomb, entrance passage
Medium: Wood, acacia
Dimensions: l. 21 cm (8 1/4 in); w. 14 cm (5 1/2 in); th. 4.7 cm (1 7/8 in)
Credit Line: Gift of Prentice Duell, 1933
Accession Number: 33.7
Not on view

Photo 15 Oct Icosahedron with faces inscribed with Greek letters. via The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Period: Ptolemaic Period–Roman PeriodDate: 2nd century B.C.–4th century A.D.Geography: From EgyptMedium: SerpentineDimensions: Height: 3.2 x L: 3.8 x W: 3.4 cm (1 1/4 x 1 1/2 x 1 5/16 in.)Credit Line: Gift of Helen Miller Gould, 1910Accession Number: 10.130.1158Not currently on view.

Icosahedron with faces inscribed with Greek letters. via The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Period: Ptolemaic Period–Roman Period
Date: 2nd century B.C.–4th century A.D.
Geography: From Egypt
Medium: Serpentine
Dimensions: Height: 3.2 x L: 3.8 x W: 3.4 cm (1 1/4 x 1 1/2 x 1 5/16 in.)
Credit Line: Gift of Helen Miller Gould, 1910
Accession Number: 10.130.1158

Not currently on view.

Video 14 Oct 3,836 notes

Nikolai Lutohin. Illustrations for Galaksija Magazine. 1970s.

(Source: magictransistor)

via FEMMETJE.
Video 13 Oct 12 notes

dmntech:

Raspberry Pi with Pi Borg case (version B)

Photo 12 Oct 162 notes
via .

Design crafted by Prashanth Kamalakanthan. Powered by Tumblr.